Thursday, June 27, 2013

Interview: Laura Osnes of Broadway's Cinderella

Santino Fantana and Laura Osnes in Rodgers and Hammerstein's Cinderella. Photo: Carol Rosegg

God’s Light Shines Bright on Broadway
By Lauren Yarger
Growing up in a suburb of Minneapolis, Laura Osnes wished that one day her dream of singing on a Broadway stage would come true. Little did she know it would -- and with a Fairy Godmother to boot.

She worked hard through high school and landed roles in musicals with performances schedules that kept her from being able to attend youth group at Oak Hills Church, affiliated with the Assemblies of God, as often as she would have liked. But when God is part of your dream, showtunes like “It’s Possible,” take on new meaning, Osnes, 27, has found.

In the latest leg of a fairytale-like journey, Osnes find herself starring eight times a week on a Broadway stage as Cinderella. She was selected for the role while this newest version of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s classic with favorite tunes like “Ten Minutes Ago,” “In My Own Little Corner” and “A Lovely Night” was still in development for its upcoming Broadway run. 

The musical had been presented on television in several versions beginning in 1957 with Julie Andrews in the lead. Versions starring Leslie Ann Warren and pop star Brandy followed, but the show never had played on Broadway until this March. For this production, with a book updated by four-time Tony Award ® nominee Douglas Carter Beane to appeal to a younger generation, producers tapped Osnes.

For the beautifully-voiced actress, Cinderella is her breakout role (she was nominated for a Tony). Osnes first burst onto the New York Theater scene in 2007 when she competed on the nationally televised search “Grease: You're the One that I Want” which landed her the role of Sandy on Broadway. She wasn’t sure she could do it, but God told her, “Go and I’ll give you what you need.”

The opportunities didn’t stop with Grease. She took over the role of Nellie Forbush in South Pacific at Lincoln Center, then was cast opposite Sutton Foster in Anything Goes before landing the lead in the new Frank Wildhorn musical Bonnie & Clyde, which had a short run on Broadway. It ran long enough, however, to earn Osnes a Tony Award ® nomination for Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Musical.

This show offered her some challenges while it was in development. Osnes was required to take the Lord’s name in vain (Three “GDs,” as she puts it) and nudity was being considered. Every Christian in the industry eventually feels pressure to be something they’re not or to do something that makes them uncomfortable, she said. She herself had turned down a role in Broadway’s Avenue Q, the racy Sesame Street lookalike show featuring puppets, because she wasn’t comfortable with its content. Those decisions can result in some difficult conversations, but “it’s so important to stay true to who you are,” she said. For Osnes, that means no nudity.

“Everybody is different and God has grace for it all, but that’s a line for me.”

Her prayers were answered for Bonnie & Clyde: the language and possible nudity were cut from the show before it hit Broadway.

Praying about everything has always been a part of life for her. She accepted the Lord when she was 3 or 4 (her dad was a Lutheran minister) and she attended her dad’s church after her parents divorced. She reaffirmed her faith as an adult.

“People know what I believe. I just don’t push it on them” she said. Not having the gift of evangelism, she feels called to have “compassion and love for everyone one,” she said as we chatted in her dressing room at the Broadway Theatre, surrounded by her costumes and props like a large pumpkin and a rubber chicken that had been cut from the show.

Sometimes she feels judged for being “so sweet and so conservative,” she said. The word “Christian” can get “such a bad rap.” She tries to use words that best communicate her faith, like “contemporary” or “worship.”

“It’s not about religion; it’s about relationships.”

She attends C3 Church Manhattan, where her husband, Nate, plays in the worship band. She also enjoys fellowshipping with other believers in Cinderella and in other shows in New York.

“There are more of us than you might think,” she said. “God has brought a lot of us to be a light.”

She takes that to heart and knows that she is an example for the young girls waiting for her autograph at the stage door.

“I’m so blessed,” she said. “So many doors have opened for me. I’m getting paid to wear a ball dress on a stage.”

Yes, some fairytales do come true.

You can find more information about the show and tickets and listen to Osnes sing “In My Own Little Corner” at http://www.cinderellaonbroadway.com/. Some “Rush” tickets priced at $32 are available on the day of the show at the Box Office, 1681 Broadway to students with valid student IDs.
 
 
Read the review of the show here:
 
 

Quick Hit Theater Review: Reasons to Be Happy

Josh Hamilton and Jenna Fischer in a scene from MCC Theater’s Reasons to Be Happy © Joan Marcus
Reasons to Be Happy
By Neil LaBute
Directed by Neil LaBute
MCC Theater Company
at the Lucille Lortel Theater

What's It All About?
It's the continuation of the story of the two couples we met in LaBute's Reasons to Be Pretty: Greg (Josh Hamilton) and Steph (Jenna Fischer of TV's "The Office") and Carly (Leslie Bibb) and Ken (Fred Weller of TV's "In Plain Sight"). It is three years after Greg and Steph have divorced. She's remarried, but isn't happy when she finds out he is seeing her best friend, Carly. Carly's ex, Kent, isn't happy either. He is still dealing with anger issues and seeing someone else, but refers to Carly as his wife. She's really falling for Greg, though. He is thoughtful and trustworthy -- two characteristics she never enjoyed in her relationship with Kent, who barely shows interest in their daughter. Steph decides she wants to give her marriage with Greg another shot, however, dumps her husband and waits for Greg to break the news to Carly. At first Greg agrees, but complications give him second thoughts.

What are the Highlights:
One of the few instances of a playwright doing a decent job of directing his own work. Blaring, heavy-metal music (Robert Kaplowitz, sound design) helps change the scenes -- and reminds us that hurt, anger and pain lie just under the surface of these relationships. I hadn't realized until the curtain went up on this piece how much I was interested to find out what had happened to these couples. There's room for third final chapter too: Reasons to be 50 and I hope La Bute writes it.

Loved the set (Neil Patel, design), which switches from the break room at the plant where Carly still works (Kent makes deliveries from another plant now and Greg, who used to work at the plant and who now is a substitute teacher, picks her up there) and other locations.

What are the Lowlights?
None. Catch it before it closes.

More info:
Reasons to Be Happy has been extended through June 29 at the Lucille Lortel Theatre, 121 Christopher St., NYC. Performances: June 27-28 at 8 pm and June 29th at 2 and 8 pm. Tickets: $69-$89: www.mcctheater.org212-352-3101.

Christians might also like to know:
-- God's name taken in vain
-- Abortion
-- Language
-- Sexual dialogue

Quick Hit Theater Review: The Boat Factory

Dan Gordon and Michael Condron. Photo: © Carol Rosegg.
The Boat Factory
By Dan Gordon
Directed by Philip Crawford
Presented by Happenstance Theatre Company  as part of the Brits Off Broadway series
59 east 59t St., NYC

What's It All About?
It's an absorbing piece of storytelling nased in history. It's about the friendship of two Belfast shipyard workers, Davy Gordon (Dan Gordon) and Georgie Kilpatrick (Michael Condron). The story begins in 1947 when Davy takes an apprenticepship at the Harland and Wolff shipyard, which built th Titanic.

Both actors play a variety of characters as the two men develop a relationship and share memories. It's touching, humorous and great storytelling

What are the Highlights?
Just the right mix of history and theater. Nice enhancements with photo projections and some music composed by Chris Warner.

What are the Lowlights?
None. Catch it before it closes this weekend.

More info:
Performances: Thursday at 7:15 pm; Friday and Saturday at 8:15; Saturday at 2:25 pm; Sunday at 3:15 pm. Tickets are $35: www.59e59.org; 212-279-4200. More info on the series: www.britsoffbroadway.com.

Christians might also like to know:
-- God's name taken in vain

Saturday, June 15, 2013

Critic Peter Filichia Performs Personal History to Benefit Episcopal Actors' Guild

After 25 years as a professional critic, Peter Filichia has seen, heard, and written about it all. In a very personal celebration of his life in the theatre, Filichia will share his most interesting moments, including adventures with nice actors (Jerry Orbach), not-so-nice ones (Mary Tyler Moore), and being face to face with Ben Vereen after giving him a bad review. 

Filichia’s Personal History has been performed in cities across the country. Now, for one night only, he brings it to historic Guild Hall, with all the proceeds benefitting The Episcopal Actors' Guild's Emergency Aid and Relief Program. A wine and cheese reception will follow the performance. 

Filichia also will sell and sign his new book "Strippers, Showgirls, and Sharks: A Very Opinionated History of the Broadway Musicals That Did Not Win the Tony Award."

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­When: Monday, June 24 at 7:00 pm

Where: Guild Hall at The Little Church Around the Corner – 1 E. 29thSt. – New York, NY 10016 (between 5th Avenue and Madison –R/N @ 28th, 6 @ 28th)

Cost: Suggested: $10 (members) & $15 (non-members)

RSVP:(212) 685-2927 or matt@actorsguild.org

Info at www.actorsguild.org and www.facebook.com/actorsguild1923.

More on Peter Filichia:
Peter Filichia is the New York-based theater critic emeritus for The Newark (N.J.) Star Ledger newspaper and News 12 television station. He is also the author of "Let's Put on a Musical" (Back Stage Books, 2007), now in its third printing; "Broadway Musicals: The Biggest Hit of the Season/The Biggest Flop of the Season" (Applause Books, 2010); and "Broadway Musical MVPs 1960-2010: The Most Valuable Players of the Last 50 Seasons" (Applause Books, 2011), chosen one of Publishers Weekly’s Top 10 Performing Arts titles of 2011.

Peter has been a columnist for Playbill, Theater.com, Theatermania and Theater Week. He blogs weekly at MasterworksBroadway.com; and writes “Filichia Features” for Musical Theatre International’s Web site, The Marquee, and “Filichia on Friday” for Kritzerland Records’ Web site.

Before joining the Theatre World Awards in 1996 as host and head of the selection committee, Peter served four terms as president of the Drama Desk. He has served on an assessment panel for the National Endowment for the Arts, and is currently critic-in-residence for the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music and the musical theater judge for the ASCAP Awards program.

Friday, June 14, 2013

Making My Broadway Debut Panel Hosted by Drama Desk

"MAKING MY BROADWAY DEBUT" PANEL
GATHERS BROADWAY STARS
CARRIE COON, SHALITA GRANT, RICHARD KIND, DEE NELSON,
JONNY ORSINI AND KEALA SETTLE
ON MONDAY, JUNE 17TH at 6:30 PM
AT FORDHAM UNIVERSITY'S POPE AUDITORIUM

Wednesday, June 12, 2013

Quick Hit Theater Review: Far From Heaven

Far From Heaven
Book By Richard Greenberg
Music by Scott Frankel
Lyrics by Michael Korie
Musical Direction by Lawrence Yurman
Choreography by Alex Sanchez
Directed by Michael Greif

What's It All About?
Well, if you have seen the film written by Todd Hayes, you know. If you haven't it's about Cathy Whitaker (Kelli O'Hara), a 1950s housewife who has it all: corporate executive husband Frank (Steven Pasquale), two perfect kids (Jake Lucas and Juliana Rigoglioso), a country club best friend, Eleanor (the aways excellent Nancy Anderson), and a beautiful house in Hartford, CT (designed in framework by Allen Moyer and accented by projections designed by Peter Nigrini).

What more could the perfectly coiffed and outfitted (Catherine Zuber, costume design; David Brian Brown, wig and hair design) want? After all, her biggest concerns are planning a dinner party menu and making sure her overworked husband gets to their social engagements in time.

"Here Comes the school bus, tally ho!" she cheerfully sings as she sends the kids off with a smile before being interviewed by the Gazette's society reporter Mrs. Leacock (a delightful Mary Stout) who praises the model housewife for being kind to "negros" like her widowed landscaper Raymond Deagan (Isaiah Johnson) and his daughter, Sarah (Elainey Bass).

The world as Cathy perceives it comes crashing down, however, when she discovers that Frank has been putting in those late nights not at the office, but with another man. 1950s social mores don't allow for such deviant behavior and he goes to therapy to try to find a cure. Meanwhile, Cathy discovers the only friend she can be candid with is Raymond, but society frowns on a white woman and a black man spending time together too.
 
What are the Highlights?
A pleasing jazzy score with funny, clever lyrics with strong performances across the board from the excellently cast ensemble directed by Michael Greif (who directed one of last season's best musicals, Giant, at the Public and who teamed with Frankel and Korie on Grey Gardens). O'Hara, whose lovely soprano always is a treat to hear, is in fine voice here. "The only One," a duet by O'Hara and Johnson is a highlight among the songs, as is the opening number, "Autumn in Connecticut."

What are the Lowlights?
Characters other than Cathy are underdeveloped. We never quite develop enough of a relationship with Frank to understand his conflict. We don't know Raymond well enough either and the relationship between him and Cathy seems forced. There is a lot of good to work with here, though. I would love to see the show developed more, fine tuned and brought to a Broadway stage.

More information:
Far From Heaven has been extended Off Broadway at Playwrights Horizons, 416 West 42nd St., NYC, through July 7. Tickets and information: http://www.playwrightshorizons.org/.

Christians might also like to know:
-- Homosexuality
-- Homosexual activity
-- God's name taken in  vain
-- Sexually suggestive lyrics
-- Language

Vanya and Kinky Boots Take Top Tony Awards

The 2013 Tony Award winners (in red). For reviews, click the link under "2012-2013 Reviews" at right.
David Hyde Pierce, Sigourney Weaver, Kristine Nielsen, and Billy Magnussen. Photo: Carol Rosegg

Best Play

The Assembled Parties by Richard Greenberg
Lucky Guy by Nora Ephron
The Testament of Mary by Colm Toíbín
Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike by Christopher Durang

Best Musical

Bring It On: The Musical
A Christmas Story, The Musical
Kinky Boots
Matilda The Musical

Best Revival of a Play

Golden Boy
Orphans
The Trip to Bountiful
Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

Best Revival of a Musical

Annie
The Mystery of Edwin Drood
Pippin
Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Cinderella
Best Book of a Musical

A Christmas Story, The Musical by Joseph Robinette
Kinky Boots by Harvey Fierstein
Matilda The Musical by Dennis Kelly
Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Cinderella by Douglas Carter Beane

Best Original Score (Music and/or Lyrics) Written for the Theatre

A Christmas Story, The Musical
Music and Lyrics: Benj Pasek and Justin Paul
Hands on a Hardbody
Music: Trey Anastasio and Amanda Green; Lyrics: Amanda Green
Kinky Boots
Music & Lyrics: Cyndi Lauper
Matilda The Musical
Music & Lyrics: Tim Minchin

Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Play

Tom Hanks, Lucky Guy
Nathan Lane, The Nance
Tracy Letts, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
David Hyde Pierce, Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike
Tom Sturridge, Orphans

Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Play

Laurie Metcalf, The Other Place
Amy Morton, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
Kristine Nielsen, Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike
Holland Taylor, Ann
Cicely Tyson, The Trip to Bountiful
 
Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Musical
 
Bertie Carvel, Matilda The Musical
Santino Fontana, Rodgers + Hammerstein’s Cinderella
Rob McClure, Chaplin
Billy Porter, Kinky Boots
Stark Sands, Kinky Boots

Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Musical


Stephanie J. Block, The Mystery of Edwin Drood
Carolee Carmello, Scandalous
Valisia LeKae, Motown The Musical
Patina Miller, Pippin
Laura Osnes, Rodgers + Hammerstein’s Cinderella

Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Play

Danny Burstein, Golden Boy
Richard Kind, The Big Knife
Billy Magnussen, Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike
Tony Shalhoub, Golden Boy
Courtney B. Vance, Lucky Guy

Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Play

Carrie Coon, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
Shalita Grant, Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike
Judith Ivey, The Heiress
Judith Light, The Assembled Parties
Condola Rashad, The Trip to Bountiful

Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Musical

Charl Brown, Motown The Musical
Keith Carradine, Hands on a Hardbody
Will Chase, The Mystery of Edwin Drood
Gabriel Ebert, Matilda The Musical
Terrence Mann, Pippin

Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Musical

Annaleigh Ashford, Kinky Boots
Victoria Clark, Rodgers + Hammerstein’s Cinderella
Andrea Martin, Pippin
Keala Settle, Hands on a Hardbody
Lauren Ward, Matilda The Musical

Best Scenic Design of a Play

John Lee Beatty, The Nance
Santo Loquasto, The Assembled Parties
David Rockwell, Lucky Guy
Michael Yeargan, Golden Boy

Best Scenic Design of a Musical

Rob Howell, Matilda The Musical
Anna Louizos, The Mystery of Edwin Drood
Scott Pask, Pippin
David Rockwell, Kinky Boots

Best Costume Design of a Play

Soutra Gilmour, Cyrano de Bergerac
Ann Roth, The Nance
Albert Wolsky, The Heiress
Catherine Zuber, Golden Boy


Best Costume Design of a Musical

Gregg Barnes, Kinky Boots
Rob Howell, Matilda The Musical
Dominique Lemieux, Pippin
William Ivey Long, Rodgers + Hammerstein’s Cinderella

Best Lighting Design of a Play

Jules Fisher & Peggy Eisenhauer, Lucky Guy
Donald Holder, Golden Boy
Jennifer Tipton, The Testament of Mary
Japhy Weideman, The Nance

Best Lighting Design of a Musical

Kenneth Posner, Kinky Boots
Kenneth Posner, Pippin
Kenneth Posner, Rodgers + Hammerstein’s Cinderella
Hugh Vanstone, Matilda The Musical

Best Sound Design of a Play

John Gromada, The Trip to Bountiful
Mel Mercier, The Testament of Mary
Leon Rothenberg, The Nance
Peter John Still and Marc Salzberg, Golden Boy

Best Sound Design of a Musical


Jonathan Deans & Garth Helm, Pippin
Peter Hylenski, Motown The Musical
John Shivers, Kinky Boots
Nevin Steinberg, Rodgers + Hammerstein’s Cinderella

Best Direction of a Play

Pam MacKinnon, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
Nicholas Martin, Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike
Bartlett Sher, Golden Boy
George C. Wolfe, Lucky Guy

Best Direction of a Musical

Scott Ellis, The Mystery of Edwin Drood
Jerry Mitchell, Kinky Boots
Diane Paulus, Pippin
Matthew Warchus, Matilda The Musical

Best Choreography
Andy Blankenbuehler, Bring It On: The Musical
Peter Darling, Matilda The Musical
Jerry Mitchell, Kinky Boots
Chet Walker, Pippin

Best Orchestrations

Chris Nightingale, Matilda The Musical
Stephen Oremus, Kinky Boots
Ethan Popp & Bryan Crook, Motown The Musical
Danny Troob, Rodgers + Hammerstein’s Cinderella 


Special Tony Award® for Lifetime Achievement in the Theatre:
Bernard Gersten , Paul Libin and Ming Cho Lee

Regional Theatre Award
The Huntington Theatre Company, Boston

Isabelle Stevenson Award
Larry Kramer

Tony Honors for Excellence in the Theatre:
NYC Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg; Career Transition For Dancers; William Craver; Peter Lawrence; The Lost Colony ; The four actresses who created the title role of Matilda The Musical on Broadway - Sophia Gennusa, Oona Laurence, Bailey Ryon and Milly Shapiro.
 
 

Saturday, June 8, 2013

My Predictions for the Tonys


Billy Porter and The Angels (L-R: Kyle Post, Kevin Smith Kirkwood, Joey Taranto, and Paul Canaan) in Kinky Boots. Photo: Matthew Murphy
By Lauren Yarger
The Tony's will be announced tomorrow night at a star-studded event at Radio City Music Hall (watch on CBS beginning at 8 pm).
Some categories are slam dunks (Andrea Martin, for example). Others are neck-and-neck. The toughest competition will be between Kinky Boots and Matilda (I think Kinky Boots will prevail).

Here are my predictions. Happy Tonys! Check back MOnday for a full list of the winners.

Best Play

Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike by Christopher Durang

Best Musical

Kinky Boots

Best Revival of a Play

Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

Best Revival of a Musical

Pippin

Best Book of a Musical

Kinky Boots by Harvey Fierstein

Best Original Score (Music and/or Lyrics) Written for the Theatre

Kinky Boots Music & Lyrics: Cyndi Lauper

Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Play


Tom Hanks, Lucky Guy

Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Play

Cicely Tyson, The Trip to Bountiful 

Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Musical

Billy Porter, Kinky Boots

Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Musical

Laura Osnes, Rodgers + Hammerstein’s Cinderella

Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Play

Richard Kind, The Big Knife

Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Play

Judith Light, The Assembled Parties

Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Musical

Terrence Mann, Pippin

Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Musical


Andrea Martin, Pippin

Best Scenic Design of a Play

John Lee Beatty, The Nance

Best Scenic Design of a Musical

Rob Howell, Matilda The Musical

Best Costume Design of a Play

Ann Roth, The Nance

Best Costume Design of a Musical

Dominique Lemieux, Pippin

Best Direction of a Play

Nicholas Martin, Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike

Best Direction of a Musical

Diane Paulus, Pippin

Best Choreography

Chet Walker, Pippin

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Our reviews are professional reviews written without a religious bias. At the end of them, you can find a listing of language, content or theological issues that Christians might want to know about when deciding which shows to see.

** Mature indicates that the show has posted an advisory because of content. Usually this means I would recommend no one under the age of 16 attend.

Theater Critic Lauren Yarger

Theater Critic Lauren Yarger

My Bio

Lauren Yarger has written, directed and produced numerous shows and special events for both secular and Christian audiences. She co-wrote a Christian musical version of “A Christmas Carol” which played to sold-out audiences of over 3,000 in Vermont and was awarded the 2000 Vermont Bessie (theater and film awards) for “People’s Choice for Theatre.” She also has written two other dinner theaters, sketches for church services and devotions for Christian artists.

Yarger trained for three years in the Broadway League’s Producer Development Program, completed the Commercial Theater Institute's Producing Three-Day Training and produced a one-woman musical about Mary Magdalene that toured nationally and closed with an off-Broadway run.

She was a Fellow at the National Critics Institute at the O'Neill Theater Center in Waterford, CT. She writes reviews of Broadway and off-Broadway theater (the only ones you can find in the US with an added Christian perspective) at http://reflectionsinthelight.blogspot.com/.

She is editor of The Connecticut Arts Connection (http://ctarts.blogspot.com), an award-winning website featuring theater and arts news for the state. She is a contributing editor for BroadwayWorld.com and is a theater reviewer for the Manchester Journal-Inquirer. She previously served as Connecticut theater editor for CurtainUp.com and as Connecticut and New York reviewer for American Theater Web.

Yarger is a book reviewer for Publishers Weekly and freelances for other sites. She is a member of the National Book Critics Circle.

She is a freelance writer and playwright and member of The Drama Desk, The Outer Critics Circle, The American Theater Critics Association and The League of Professional Theatre Women. She served as a judge for the SDX Awards presented by the Society of Professional Journalists. She also is a member of the Connecticut Critics Circle and the CT Press Club.

A former newspaper editor and graduate of the University of Missouri’s School of Journalism, Yarger also worked in arts management for the Bushnell Center for the Performing Arts, the Hartford Symphony Orchestra and served for nine years as the Executive Director of Masterwork Productions, Inc. She lives with her husband in West Granby, CT. They have two adult children.

Copyright

All material is copyright 2008- 2017 by Lauren Yarger. Reviews and articles may not be reprinted without permission. Contact reflectionsinthelight@gmail.com

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Key to Content Notes:

God's name taken in vain -- means God or Jesus is used in dialogue without speaking directly to or about them.

Language -- means some curse words are used. "Minor" usually means the words are not too strong or that it only occurs once or twice throughout the show.

Strong Language -- means some of the more heavy duty curse words are used.

Nudity -- means a man or woman's backside, a man's lower front or a woman's front are revealed.

Scantily clad -- means actors' private areas are technically covered, but I can see a lot of them.

Sexual Language -- means the dialogue contains sexually explicit language but there's no action.

Sexual Activity -- means a man and woman are performing sexual acts.

Adultery -- Means a married man or woman is involved sexually with someone besides their spouse. If this is depicted with sexual acts on stage, the list would include "sexual activity" as well.

Sex Outside of Marriage -- means a man and woman are involved sexually without being married. If this is depicted sexually on stage, the list would include "sexual activity" as well.

Homosexuality -- means this is in the show, but not physically depicted.

Homosexual activity -- means two persons of the same sex are embracing/kissing. If they do more than that, the list would include "sexual activity" as well.

Cross Dresser -- Means someone is dressing as the opposite sex. If they do more than that on stage the listing would include the corresponding "sexual activity" and/or "homosexual activity" as well.

Cross Gender -- A man is playing a female part or a woman is playing a man's part.

Suggestive Dancing -- means dancing contains sexually suggestive moves.

Derogatory (category added Fall 2012) Language or circumstances where women are referred to or treated in a negative and demeaning manner.

Other content matters such as torture, suicide or rape will be noted, with details revealed only as necessary in the review itself.

The term "throughout" added to any of the above means it happens many times throughout the show.

Reviewing Policy

I receive free seats to Broadway and Off-Broadway shows made available to all voting members of the Outer Critics Circle and The Drama Desk, the two professional critics organizations with journalists covering NY theater. Journalistically, I provide an unbiased review and am under no obligation to make positive statements. Sometimes shows do not make tickets available to reviewers. If these are shows my readers want to know about (I review all Broadway shows and pertinent Off-Broadway shows), I will purchase a ticket. If a personal friend is involved in a production, I'll let you know, but it won't influence a review. If I feel there is a conflict, I won't review their portion of the production.

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