Thursday, September 6, 2012

Online Audition Submissions Sought for Ralphie in Broadway-Bound 'A Christmas Story'

Photo credit: Don Ipock and Kansas City Rep
A Christmas Story, The Musical takes its search nationally for a young boy to play the iconic role of ‘Ralphie’ with submissions now available online.  As the Broadway-bound production prepares to launch a 2012 holiday engagement, the show’s producers invite young performers to submit their audition within the next ten days by visiting www.AChristmasStoryTheMusical.com and following three simple steps:

1.    Record a video of yourself singing a brief song that is rhythmic and that shows us your voice, high notes, and personality. A classic Broadway belt or a holiday song is suggested. We want you to have a good time and show us your personality!

2.    Get a recent digital picture or headshot of yourself and your resume. (If you don’t have a resume, just prepare a brief paragraph about yourself in a Word Document.)

3.    Go to www.AChristmasStoryTheMusical.com and click on the "Are You Our Next Ralphie" link to register with our online casting site, LetItCast®, and follow their instructions to submit your video, photo, and information.

In casting the role of ‘Ralphie’ casting directors are seeking submissions from boys who can play 10-11, who are under 4’11”, excellent singers with unchanged voices, who act. They must be comfortable on stage, bright, and real. We are looking for a boy who is a regular kid, with enormous talent.

According to the show’s producer Peter Billingsley, "Yes, the role is truly available and in the same way the original film was cast, this is a bona fide national search. We are in the final two weeks of auditions for the right Ralphie who could be Broadway's next sensation."

Rehearsals for A Christmas Story, The Musical will begin in New York City on October 1 and performances will run from November 5 until December 30.

For details about our online submissions and how to upload a video-taped audition please go to: www.letitcast.com.  Questions can be directed to: ACSauditions@gmail.com.

*  *  *


A Christmas Story, The Musical will arrive on Broadway at The Lunt-Fontanne Theatre just in time for the 2012 holiday season.  The producers have announced that the new musical, based on the 1983 movie perennial, will play a November 5 – December 30 holiday engagement.  Opening night is Monday, November 19.  Tickets are now on sale at www.AChristmasStoryTheMuscial.com or www.TicketMaster.com.

America’s #1 holiday movie came to hilarious life onstage when A Christmas Story, The Musical launched a tour in 2011 with stops in Hershey, PA; Detroit, MI; Raleigh, NC; Tampa, FL; and Chicago, IL. The musical features a bright holiday score by composer/lyricist team Benj Pasek and Justin Paul and a witty book by Joseph Robinette based on the writings of radio humorist Jean Shepherd and the 1983 holiday film favorite. Tony Award winner John Rando (Urinetown) directs the production with Warren Carlyle (Chaplin, Follies, An Evening With Hugh Jackman) choreographing.  Casting is soon to be announced.

A Christmas Story, The Musical features scenic design by Walt Spangler; costume design by Elizabeth Hope Clancy; lighting design by Tony Award winner  Howell Binkley; sound design by Ken Travis; wig design by Tom Watson; orchestrations by Larry Blank; music direction and  supervision by Ian Eisendrath; dance music arrangements by Glen Kelly; and vocal arrangements by Justin Paul.

The story from a cherished movie classic that’s enchanted millions is now a musical spectacular. In 1940’s Indiana, a bespectacled boy named Ralphie has a big imagination and one wish for Christmas—a Red Ryder BB Gun. A kooky leg lamp, outrageous pink bunny pajamas, a cranky department store Santa, and a triple-dog-dare to lick a freezing flagpole are just a few of the obstacles that stand between Ralphie and his Christmas dream. Co-produced by the film’s original Ralphie, Peter Billingsley, A Christmas Story, The Musical is holiday entertainment that captures a simpler time in America with delicious wit and a heart of gold.

A Christmas Story, The Musical is produced by Gerald Goehring, Roy Miller, Michael F. Mitri, Pat Flicker Addiss, Peter Billingsley, Timothy Laczynski, Mariano Tolentino, Louise H. Beard, Michael Filerman, Scott Hart, Bob Bartner, Michael Jenkins, Angela Milonas, Bradford W. Smith.

Read a review of a preview production in Hershey, PA here.

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Our reviews are professional reviews written without a religious bias. At the end of them, you can find a listing of language, content or theological issues that Christians might want to know about when deciding which shows to see.

** Mature indicates that the show has posted an advisory because of content. Usually this means I would recommend no one under the age of 16 attend.

Theater Critic Lauren Yarger

Theater Critic Lauren Yarger

My Bio

Lauren Yarger has written, directed and produced numerous shows and special events for both secular and Christian audiences. She co-wrote a Christian musical version of “A Christmas Carol” which played to sold-out audiences of over 3,000 in Vermont and was awarded the 2000 Vermont Bessie (theater and film awards) for “People’s Choice for Theatre.” She also has written two other dinner theaters, sketches for church services and devotions for Christian artists.

Yarger trained for three years in the Broadway League’s Producer Development Program, completed the Commercial Theater Institute's Producing Three-Day Training and produced a one-woman musical about Mary Magdalene that toured nationally and closed with an off-Broadway run.

She was a Fellow at the National Critics Institute at the O'Neill Theater Center in Waterford, CT. She writes reviews of Broadway and off-Broadway theater (the only ones you can find in the US with an added Christian perspective) at http://reflectionsinthelight.blogspot.com/.

She is editor of The Connecticut Arts Connection (http://ctarts.blogspot.com), an award-winning website featuring theater and arts news for the state. She is a contributing editor for BroadwayWorld.com and is a theater reviewer for the Manchester Journal-Inquirer. She previously served as Connecticut theater editor for CurtainUp.com and as Connecticut and New York reviewer for American Theater Web.

Yarger is a book reviewer for Publishers Weekly and freelances for other sites. She is a member of the National Book Critics Circle.

She is a freelance writer and playwright and member of The Drama Desk, The Outer Critics Circle, The American Theater Critics Association and The League of Professional Theatre Women. She served as a judge for the SDX Awards presented by the Society of Professional Journalists. She also is a member of the Connecticut Critics Circle and the CT Press Club.

A former newspaper editor and graduate of the University of Missouri’s School of Journalism, Yarger also worked in arts management for the Bushnell Center for the Performing Arts, the Hartford Symphony Orchestra and served for nine years as the Executive Director of Masterwork Productions, Inc. She lives with her husband in West Granby, CT. They have two adult children.

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All material is copyright 2008- 2017 by Lauren Yarger. Reviews and articles may not be reprinted without permission. Contact reflectionsinthelight@gmail.com

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Key to Content Notes:

God's name taken in vain -- means God or Jesus is used in dialogue without speaking directly to or about them.

Language -- means some curse words are used. "Minor" usually means the words are not too strong or that it only occurs once or twice throughout the show.

Strong Language -- means some of the more heavy duty curse words are used.

Nudity -- means a man or woman's backside, a man's lower front or a woman's front are revealed.

Scantily clad -- means actors' private areas are technically covered, but I can see a lot of them.

Sexual Language -- means the dialogue contains sexually explicit language but there's no action.

Sexual Activity -- means a man and woman are performing sexual acts.

Adultery -- Means a married man or woman is involved sexually with someone besides their spouse. If this is depicted with sexual acts on stage, the list would include "sexual activity" as well.

Sex Outside of Marriage -- means a man and woman are involved sexually without being married. If this is depicted sexually on stage, the list would include "sexual activity" as well.

Homosexuality -- means this is in the show, but not physically depicted.

Homosexual activity -- means two persons of the same sex are embracing/kissing. If they do more than that, the list would include "sexual activity" as well.

Cross Dresser -- Means someone is dressing as the opposite sex. If they do more than that on stage the listing would include the corresponding "sexual activity" and/or "homosexual activity" as well.

Cross Gender -- A man is playing a female part or a woman is playing a man's part.

Suggestive Dancing -- means dancing contains sexually suggestive moves.

Derogatory (category added Fall 2012) Language or circumstances where women are referred to or treated in a negative and demeaning manner.

Other content matters such as torture, suicide or rape will be noted, with details revealed only as necessary in the review itself.

The term "throughout" added to any of the above means it happens many times throughout the show.

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I receive free seats to Broadway and Off-Broadway shows made available to all voting members of the Outer Critics Circle and The Drama Desk, the two professional critics organizations with journalists covering NY theater. Journalistically, I provide an unbiased review and am under no obligation to make positive statements. Sometimes shows do not make tickets available to reviewers. If these are shows my readers want to know about (I review all Broadway shows and pertinent Off-Broadway shows), I will purchase a ticket. If a personal friend is involved in a production, I'll let you know, but it won't influence a review. If I feel there is a conflict, I won't review their portion of the production.

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